Are drive thru branches really relevant in the 21st century?

Metro Bank has announced that it will open in May the first drive thru branch in the UK this century. The branch will be alongside a dual carriageway in Slough the town that was the setting for Ricky Gervais’ ‘The Office’. It will consist of its own dual carriageway – one for ATM and automated deposit services and one for access to a teller for day-to-day transactions.

The UK does not have a history of drive thru bank branches with only three having been recorded – the first in 1959, the second in 1966 and finally one at Hatton Cross near Heathrow Airport in 1998. Given that there has been so little success with drive thru branches in the past the question has to be asked why not and what is different this time?

Most banks  are increasingly trying to drive transactions out of the branches rather than through them encouraging their customers to carry out routine transactions online either through internet or mobile banking. Along with this and the use of cash declining, this  move on Metro Bank’s part seems counter intuitve. However Metro Bank was launched on the basis that it did not want to be like other banks.  Vernon Hill, the American founder of Metro Bank, is not someone to follow the herd. Hill grew Commerce Bank, the successful banking business in the US, based on his experience of running McDonald’s franchises. He sold TD Bank before coming to the UK and based on that experience launched the first new bank in the UK.

Metro Bank has focussed on providing a different, louder, more US-styled experience for customers with features such as ‘magic’ coin-counting machines that look like Vegas slot machines, lollipops and free dog biscuits.

Metro Bank proudly does not compete on price but on the customer experience it provides. The launch of the drive thru bank is part of this differentiated experience. It comes ahead of the launch of seven business day switching that all UK banks will need to adhere to from October 2013 and in anticipation of increased competition from other new entrants such as Tesco, Marks & Spencer and Virgin Money.

Banks for many years now have actively attempted to re-purpose branches from transaction processing to retail outlets where the customer is encouraged to spend the time required to open more complex products such as current accounts and mortgages.

The Metro Bank drive thru branches will clearly be servicing not sales centres, however they will be paired with a more traditional branch where sales can be carried out.

However the more recent trend in retail banking is very much towards omni-channel where digital is integrated into the whole customer experience irrelevant of which channel is used. This is where the leading banks are investing. This includes bringing internet and mobile banking into the branches and through digital bringing the contact center operative and the banking advisor into the home or onto the smart phone or tablet.

Tesco another new entrant into full service banking is investing heavily into digital and omni-channel banking prior to its full launch. Metro Bank does have an online banking service but does not major on this or reflect that in their current seventeen branches.

It is unlikely that the launch of drive thru banking is going to be the breakthrough strategy for Metro Bank that takes them from being a small but attention-grabbing player to being a significant threat to the big 5 banks, but it will certainly get them some free publicity.

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