Is NBNK drinking at The Last Chance Saloon?

With the speculation that NBNK are pulling out of the bidding for National Australia Bank’s UK banks, Yorkshire and Clydesdale, due to the price being asked being unrealistically high. given is that the level Given that the level of impairments in NAB’s UK mortgage book could be as high as 30% and the desire of Cameron Clyne, CEO of NAB, to get a price that the market won’t bear, this, if confirmed, would be a wise move on the part of NBNK.

Given the market sentiment towards the banks, particularly with the uncertainty of what will happen in Europe and the faltering UK economy, now is not a good time to sell banking assets. For NAB or any other banking organisation looking to sell out of the UK when there is a focus on building capital reserves taking the write down on UK banking assets would not be seen to be a smart move by investors.

NBNK (New Bank) is an investment vehicle backed by some of the biggest asset managers and led by Lord Levene, former Chairman of Lloyds of London, the insurer not the bank, with the sole objective of buying banking assets. Having lost out to Virgin Money, which bought the Northern Rock ‘good’ bank, and not being selected as the preferred option for the Lloyds Banking Group sale of 632 branches (Project Verde), the options for NBNK do not look good.

With the negotiations between Co-operative Bank and Lloyds Banking Group for Verde floundering, NBNK last week put in a revised proposal for Verde. The response from Lloyds Banking Group was cool. Whilst they acknowledged the receipt of the letter, they re-emphasised that they are in exclusive talks with the Co-operative Bank.

It is increasingly unlikely that the Co-op negotiations will end successfully with questions over the structure, governance, ability to raise capital and the ability to execute on the deal being raised by the FSA (Financial Services Authority).

If the Co-op is unable to get to an agreed deal will NBNK be re-invited into negotiations? Currently the Lloyds Banking Group stanc is that their fall back position is a floatation of a mini-me version of Lloyds TSB. However this would require investors backing the IPO and there is certainly skepticism amongst the investment community as to whether that would be achievable. If banking assets are seen as generally undesirable at the moment what is going to change for a Lloyds Banking IPO? The concerns about an IPO would not just be limited to the ability to raise the finance, but equally the leadership of the mini-me Lloyds TSB would be scruitinised by the FSA. The current leadership of Verde does not consist of obvious big hitters and would need to go through the FSA approval process, before the deal could get away. For Tesco it took nearly two years to get that approval.

For NBNK, if they are invited back into negotiations then they would need to conduct a very detailed due diligence as the deal execution risks are very high. After all the systems and processes that Lloyds Banking Group are putting into the deal can’t be that good, otherwise why is LBG spending more than a billion pounds on the post-merger ‘Simplification’ programme, much of which is being spent on the technology that they are suggesting that the buyer would be stuck with for not an inconsiderable time?

For NBNK with so few opportunities out there to acquire banking assets, are they now drinking at The Last Chance Saloon? Is it time to call last orders, to close down the fund and gracefully walk away?

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