RBS forced to go down under for Retail Banking chief

RBS has announced that its new head of Retail Banking will be Ross McEwan. Despite the Scottish name, which undoubtedly is helpful at RBSG, Mr McEwan is from down under. He replaces Australian Brian Hartzer who is returning to his homeland to take up a similar role at Westpac (see http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2011/11/wanted-ceo-for-uk-retail-bank.html ). It is not only native Australians that are making the journey down under, but there has been a flood of banking executives working in the UK who have decided to up sticks and move to the Southern Hemisphere (see http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2012/01/trickle-becomes-flood-as-bankers-leave.html ).

Whilst a number of UK banking executives were approached and interviewed for the role that Ross McEwan will fill none of them were interested. This has to raise the question why? Certainly for executives with successful careers at banks free of government shareholdings such as HSBC and Santander there are clear reasons why a move to RBSG may hold little appeal. Given the turgid time Stephen Hester has had with his compensation and personal life discussed very publicly in the press and in Parliament to the point where even he considered resigning, why would anyone put themselves into that position when they don’t need to? With the level of government implicit and explicit interference in the running of RBSG, there have to be better places to work. For the ambitious executive who sees heading Retail Banking at RBS as a career stepping stone the question is what would be the move after that? Almost certainly not into the CEO role of one of the UK banks as RBSG is a damaged brand and there are no obvious CEO roles coming up at the UK banks in the next few years. The probability is, as evidenced by Brian Hartzer, that the next move after heading up Retail Banking at RBSG would most likely be a CEO role in Australia. Not all UK banking executives or their families would see that as attractive.

With the Vickers ICB (Independent Commission on Banking)  recommendations coming into law including the ring-fencing of retail banking, the increased scutiny of bankers’ compensation and the antagonistic attitude of British politicians towards bankers, the UK Government has made a career in UK banking very unattractive. For the state-backed banks, RBSG and Lloyds Banking Group, this has been made even more unattractive which means that these organisations are finding it even more difficult to attract top talent. The time it has taken for Lloyds Banking Group to find a replacement for Truett Tate, the head of Wholesale Banking is just one example of this.

Yet it needs to be recognised that to turn around these banks top talent is needed because these are some of the toughest challenges.

RBSG and Lloyds Banking Group are not alone in struggling to hire and retain top talent, it appears that having recruited Rumi Contractor from HSBC to become the UK Retail  and Business Banking COO in January that they have already parted company.

With HSBC CEO Stuart Gulliver suggesting that, with the increased cost of conducting retail banking, that pulling out of the UK is a real possibility, resulting in significant layoffs, reducing the number of  quality UK banking executives dramatically, there is a serious threat to the sector.

For the UK to retain its position as one of the key the Financial Services centres of the world, the sector needs to be able to attract the right talent. This is critical to the recovery of the UK economy. Isn’t it about time that the politicians took the lead and put an end to the relentless bashing of the banks?

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